FOOD-ALLERGY-IN-CHILDREN

While you think that it is a flu or cold, it may be in fact arising from food allergy.

ATTENTION TO FOOD ALLERGY IN CHILDREN!

Has your child’s nose suddenly begin to run like a faucet? Or tears dripping continously from the eyes? While you were wondering whether it was a cold, were red rashes added to his or her cough? These symptoms suddenly put mothers into a state of total panic. This is because their babies had just began complementary foods. The baby would face the challenges of adapting to solid food, and all of a sudden these complaints emerged! Well, the problem is exactly here. One or few of the foods that were added to your baby’s diet may have resulted in the food allergy that resembles the flu.

One should not panic immediately when food allergy is mentioned, this is because understanding it is very simple. Obeying a simple rule while moving to complementary food after the first six months is all that is needed! Give every new supplementary food that you will add to your baby’s diet three days in a row. When you give only that food for three days, and these symptoms occur within three day, then you can understand that it is food allergy. Pediatrics specialist Özlem Yücel Altay, MD, from Acibadem Bakırköy Hospital, states that food allergy may disappear in time, nevertheless the first step in treatment is elimination of the food from the diet.

Give your baby seasonal fruit

The unsurpassed superiority of mother’s milk in infant feeding is unquestionable. When your baby becomes six months old, then time has come to begin complementary food. Your baby, who is used to feeding with only with liquids until that day, will undoubtedly experience both the joy and difficulties of being introduced to solid food. This is because the factor of chewing will be added. In conditions where the mother’s milk is not adequate, the babies with inadequate weight gains ( less than 500 grams a month) may be introduced to complementary food as early as 4 months. Consumption of seasonal vegetables and fruits are important in the transition to complementary food. Pediatrics specialist Özlem Yücel Altay, MD, from Acibadem Bakırköy Hospital states that feeding can be initiated with potato, carrot, and squash, and then depending on the season, it cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, pumpkin, spinach, leek, purslane, green bean, pea, cabbage, celery, asparagus, and artichoke, which can be given alternately and in groups of three. Garlic may be added to the list in the following days. This is just the season for carrot, pea, asparagus, artichoke, and purslane. Among the fruits, those which can be given are apple and pear, which may be followed by peach, apricot, banana, water melon, and melon depending on the season. Dr. Yucel states that during these days in which seasonal fruits are abundant in markets, babies can be fed with apple, banana, peach, apricot, damson plum, puree of water melon and melon. The babies should taste the fruits one at a time, then two fruits are needed to be combined.

Foods not allowed before age 1

There are some foods that are not allowed in children under 1 year of age. For example, eggplant is not allowed until age 1 because it contains nicotine and its nutritional values is low. Similarly broad beans are not allowed because they may trigger jaundice in people with “glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency”. Strawberry, tomato, and tropical fruits should not be attempted before age 1 due to their allergic properties. Cow’s milk, honey, hazelnut, peanut, and eggwhite should not be given before 9 or 12 months. Dr. Yücel states that cow’s milk can be used in mixtures after 9 months, and if it becomes necessary it should be diluted. Orange and tangerine may increase reflux, therefore they should not be given on their own, but by mixing with other foods such as banana, carrot juice. Grape juice is very sweet, so it should not be given on its own to prevent your baby getting used to sweets.

It is important to increase the size of lumps in textured food after the 8th month

An important trick in feeding is to increase the amount of texture after the 8th month in complementary food, which was given in a pudding form until the 8th month. For example, the baby can swallow particles that are sized between one half to two thirds of the size of a pea. Dr. Yücel states that a 9 month old baby can eat table food, all food can be given provided that they are unsalted and crushed with a fork, and blenders should not be used for children at age 9 months. She adds ”If transition to solid foods can be performed healthily, then we will not have created children who gag with the smallest lump in food and who are called blender babies.” One of the errors made by mothers is to say “My child did not like this vegetable soup” and never give again. Dr. Yücel states that in that condition mothers should try different vegetables, give a break to the vegetable puree that the child disliked, and try again after a week. Vegetable puree should be enriched with olive oil or grains (pounded wheat, semolina, rice, dried mixture of curd and flour, lentil, etc.), and should be combined with meat and chicken, and after the 7-8th months, with fish.

Symptoms of food allergy

Oversensitivity reactions against foods, which are mediated by the immune system, are named “food allergy”. Families of babies with food allergy often have food allergy or allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema. In other words, there is a genetic tendency. Then how can you understand if your child has food allergy? Below are the symptoms of food allergy:
In the skin: Itching, redness, urticaria, swelling in the lips and eyelids, eczema
In the upper respiratory tract: Nasal obstruction-itching-discharge, sneezing, dryness or itching in the throat, itching of the palate, dry cough
In the eyes: Wetness, itching, redness, and swelling in the eyelids
In the lower respiratory tract: Shortness of breath, wheezing-humming, cough
In the digestive system: Nausea-vomiting, abdominal pain, bloody and mucoid diarrhea, cramps, food refusal
In the heart and vessels: Palpitation, cyanosis, low blood pressure, dizziness, fainting

Attention mothers! The key to understanding food allergy

Has your child’s nose suddenly begin to run like a faucet? Or tears dripping continously from the eyes? While you were wondering whether it was a cold, were red rashes added to his or her cough? These symptoms suddenly put mothers into a state of total panic. One of few of the foods that were added to your baby’s diet after the 6th month may have caused food allergy that resembles the flu. Speaking of food allergy  should not create panic because it is very easy to understand it. You only need to obey a simple rule while passing to complementary food after the first 6 months. Every new food that you will give to your baby should be given 3 days in a row. In addition, give only that food on its own, so that when these symptoms occur you will understand that it is food allergy. Dr. Özlem Altay states that food allergy may disappear in time, however the first step in treatment is completely removing the allergen food from the diet. For example cow’s milk allergy is one of the most common allergies. In the treatment, cow’s milk and all food produced from cow’s milk is discontinued. Diet is supported with a special formula. Mothers and fathers should follow these allergies under guidance of a pediatrician or pediatric allergy specialists. Allergy is monitored with tests performed in the skin or blood. The food is reintroduced when there is an improvement in these tests. Dr. Yücel states that in some mild food allergies, for example there occurs one or two rashes around the mouth after eating tomato, then the food may be given after one or two months and if there are no rashes or additional symptoms then the food may be given by gradually increasing the amount.